How to Focus While Playing Golf

How to Focus While Playing Golf

There is much focus that is needed in the sport of golf. Naturally, when you need golf focus, it can be very easy to burn out from it. With golf mostly being slow-paced, the game provides many windows and opportunities for you to think. You can collect your thoughts, as well as focus on the mental aspect of your next move in the game. Losing concentration during a game of golf can be costly. If you want to play to the best of your ability, honing in on different tips and tricks to keep you alert and focused is important.

Deer Creek is here to give you tips on how to focus better in golf. We have a full golf course with 18 upgraded holes and brand-new TifEagle Ultradwarf bermudagrass in a high-end setting. At Deer Creek, we have the knowledge to offer advice on staying focused on your game of golf so you can play your best game. Keep reading to learn more from our golf experts.

The Mental Aspect of Golf

As with many sports, the mental aspect of golf is almost as important as the physical aspect. As simple as it sounds, thinking positively can affect your ability to focus. If you go into the game with a negative attitude, your focus will not be in the right place. It might not even be present at all. Work on your process, not your score. Overthinking about your downswing, the takeaway, or your grip can really interfere with your mental state and ability to focus.

Losing Concentration During a Golfing Game

A tip that can help you hold concentration during a golf game is splitting the 18-hole game into rounds of three holes per round. Doing this makes it three mini-games during each of the two rounds. Having mini-games is very helpful because completing nine holes twice in a row can become very tedious. Typically it is during the second set of nine holes that people begin to lose focus.

Another tip is to only focus on one hole at a time. Completely forget about how the previous holes went – good or bad. Don’t begin to think about the upcoming holes. Focusing on the hole at hand will increase not only your performance but your ability to focus throughout the game. This is because your head will be less cluttered, and you will not be thinking about the past or the future.

Having a pre-shot routine, as well as practice routines, can be tasks that contribute to your ability to focus. Prepare your pre-shot routine earlier than you already do. You’ll be able to look at the slope of the ball as well as feel how heavy the wind is at the time of day. Many professional golfers recommend that you think to yourself, “What does the shape of my shot look like?” Course management can bring consistency. This will help create less noise about what your next steps are. It will also give you more room for your golf focus, and you can concentrate on how well you are about to play.

Playing a Focused Game of Golf at Deer Creek

Once you have these tips down, you can check out our tee times and rates. If you have any questions about our course, contact us today.

What Is Golf Etiquette for Beginners?

What Is Golf Etiquette for Beginners?

While there are different golf courses, the behavior and rules on the courses don’t change. It is important when you start golfing that you know the proper etiquette so you can play accordingly. What is golf etiquette for beginners? The experts at Deer Creek can help answer that. 

There are three categories of golf etiquette to know:

  • Consideration for other players
  • Pace of play
  • Care of the course

 

When people head to the course for the first time or even their 100th time, they should know basic golf etiquette for beginners. 

 

Golf Etiquette for Beginners

Depending on the seriousness of the group you are playing with, you may or may not want to adopt some of the more formal etiquette practices. It is important to know the expectations of the group before the round starts. Whatever your group rules are, here is some basic etiquette you should follow:

 

  • The lowest score on the previous hole tees off first.
  • The player furthest from the hole goes first. This includes the green.
  • Mark your ball when on the green while others are putting.
  • Don’t walk in between a player’s or your own ball and the hole on the green.
  • Be quiet while others are hitting their shots.

 

These are the universal etiquette rules unless the group has decided against them or on different rules for the day. It can also depend on the skill level of the group. If the group has a higher skill level, then the more traditional rules will work best. If the skill level is lower or mixed, then the game may move differently. However, the ability to play golf shouldn’t dictate the pace of play. If you’re new to the game, you can set a limit for yourself. Start with a stroke limit of 8 for each hole. Once you get to 8, pick up the ball and place it on the green to finish your hole from there. There are also etiquette practices regarding the pace of play:

 

  • Write down the scores at the next tee box.
  • Park your golf cart on the side of the green towards the next hole.
  • When it’s your turn to play, make sure you are ready.
  • Limit the amount of time spent at the turn (between holes 9 and 10), or let the group behind you play.
  • Limit practice swings to 2. You should hit the driving range beforehand to get some practice in.
  • If you are a larger group of 3 or more, send the first person to putt at the next tee box as soon as they are done with a hole. 

 

It is easy to get wrapped up in your own game. Be mindful of the groups behind you to ensure they aren’t waiting for you and your group to finish every hole. If this happens 3 to 4 holes in a row, think about letting them play ahead of you, or you can play more quickly.

 

Contact Deer Creek Golf Club

Once you have these rules down, then you can check out our tee times and rates. If you have any questions about our course, then contact us today.

How to Not Slice a Golf Ball

How to Not Slice a Golf Ball

“Slicing” in golf is when a sidespin is put on a ball, which means golf shots go right for a right-handed player and left for left-handed players. It is known as one of the most common faults in golf. It is not as destructive as the hook (a ball that curves during flight,) but it still does not help one to get a good score in their game. Unfortunately, it is not always a quick or easy fix, either. 

Deer Creek Golf Club has seen and worked with many golfers over the years that have overcome this fault in our golf school. With this experience, we are able to offer some advice and tips on how to not slice a golf ball. 

 

Tips to Stop Slicing

There are a few factors at play when a golfer continuously slices. No one wants to waste a tee time on slices and bad shots. Here are ways that work for some, including our professionals’ basic tips and things you can work on. 

 

#1 Work on Proper Weight Shift

A common theme among slicers is having incorrect or insufficient weight transfer in their swing. When players get to the top of their backswing and the first move is made by the shoulders and arms is where the expression “coming over the top” comes from. The feet get stuck because the player is putting too much weight on the back foot. 

A good weight shift comes from the proper sequence of movements starting in the lower body, feet, knees, then hips. Then the upper body follows the upper torso, arms, and hands, all in that order. This means that the hands, which control the club, will stay more inside the correct path for a decent swing. 

 

#2 Turn Through the Impact

Good golfers who have proper weight will shift and turn their bodies through the impact and, more often than not, won’t slice. If professional golfers are analyzed, it will often be seen that their shoulders are about 15 to 30 degrees left of the target, and hips are between 30 to 60 degrees leftward. 

Tips #1 and $2 are about correcting the motion of the body as a way to stop slicing. 

 

#3 Don’t Aim for a Slice

Many golfers who are dealing with a slicing problem attempt to aim more left as a fix for how to correct the right slice in golf. That is not the answer! If a round is being played with a left-to-right wind, then aiming more left will just further exaggerate the slice. A wind that is coming off the left may stall the ball’s forward motion, meaning it’s going nowhere. 

By working on correcting the swing and path of motion, golfers learn how to get the clubface and stance more squared up, which helps overcome the slice regardless of the wind patterns.

 

#4 Try Stronger Grips to Make It Easier to Square Up the Clubface

The face of the club naturally rotates closed as it approaches impact. A common problem that golfers have is being able to allow this to efficiently happen. Some players overdo it, and suddenly, instead of slicing, they’ve pulled insanely left. 

A way to square the clubface up to avoid either of those bad shots is to strengthen the grip a little. For right-handed players, stronger grips mean more knuckles of the left hand and, if necessary, dropping the right hand slightly under the shaft. 

 

#5 Use Softer Flex Shafts

As golfers swing down, the club head is initially lagging behind the hands. With stiffer and heavier shafts, it makes it harder for it to catch up correctly, while light and flexible shafts help the club head kick forward before impact. This creates more rotation of the face which then helps square up the face and adds loft to the face, which minimizes the headspin on the ball at impact. 

Softer shafts should be used by players who slice, while heavier ones should be used by those who struggle with the hook. 

 

Contact Deer Creek Golf Club

We hope our tips for how to not slice a golf ball have helped and if you are interested in our golf school, tee times, or rates, contact us today! If you are in the area, you can also check out our pro golf shop, filled with all the attire, accessories, and equipment you’ll need to look like a pro golfer.

Golf Fitness

Golf Fitness

Deer Creek Golf Club has helped and taught many players golf strength and conditioning workouts to better their game. Focusing on this type of fitness is a great way to target specific areas that could be affecting your golf game. Golf fitness involves a lot of mobility work and balance that can translate into a better swing. There are four main areas that should be focused on when thinking about golf fitness:

  • Balance
  • Stability
  • Rotational strength
  • Power

Adding these elements together and into your regular fitness routine will only be beneficial to your swing and overall golf game. In addition, keeping up with proper fitness can prevent your body from feeling pain which can be caused by incorrect form or weaker muscles. Practicing this type of fitness can target all the muscles needed when playing golf. 

 

Balance Workouts

Balance is often the part of golf fitness that gets forgotten or doesn’t get the amount of attention it deserves. Here are some tips and workouts to incorporate into your fitness routine to focus on balance.

 

Single-Leg Hip Circles

Stand with your hands on your hips and your feet hip-width apart. Shift your weight over to your right leg and slowly lift your left leg out to the side. After establishing your balance, begin making circles out to the side with your left leg. Try to maintain stability and balance in the knee and ankle of the left leg to reduce too much movement. All movement should be in the left hip. Do it five times clockwise and counterclockwise, then switch legs and repeat. 

 

Highwire Shoulder Raises

This is a combination of shoulder work and balance. Start with a light dumbbell (5 to 10 lbs) in each hand, and your arms should start by your side. Place your right foot directly in front of your left foot as if you were walking on a tightrope or highwire. Once you find your balance, lift your right arm out to the side until it is parallel with the ground. While keeping that balance, lower your right arm and repeat with the left arm. Continue until you’ve completed 10 reps on each side. 

Switch legs and repeat. 

 

Single-Leg Chipping

Grab a club and set up as if you were about to knock a 30-yard chip onto the green. Bench your trail knee (right knee if you are right-handed, left if you are left-handed) and lift that foot off the ground. Maintain your balance in this one-legged set-up potion and practice your chip shot. Aim to keep that trail leg up in the air and keep the clubhead from touching the floor for at least three perfect shots at a time. 

Once you have mastered this, switch the foot that is in the air and try to get three perfect shots without the front foot touching the ground. As you master the skills, up the distance of the chip shot to 50 yards and so on. 

 

Stability Training

Stability and balance go hand in hand in most sports and workouts. It is no different in any golf training guide. If there is a lack of stability, then the swing of any golfer will be compromised. Here are some stability training workouts to work on. 

 

Shoulder Taps

Starting on all fours, lift your knees off the ground so that you are now in a high plank position. Slowly alternate between one hand tapping the opposite shoulder and placing it back on the ground. This type of exercise strengthens core and cross-body stability. It also helps protect your lower back and helps efficiently transfer force through the spine while maintaining the angle. 

 

Side Leg Side Reach

Get your balance on one foot and keep the opposite foot low to the ground, then reach side to side without losing your balance. Let your head and upper body lean in the opposite direction to maintain a nice long line from the tip of your head to your foot. This will help build up stability in ankles, knees, hips, and spine in the frontal plane and help transition weight side to side like you would in a golf swing. Do this for three sets of 10 reps on each side. 

 

Palloff Lunge

For this exercise, you will use a cable machine or a resistance band. Have the cable or band directly out to your side and hold it in your hands directly in front of your sternum and begin stepping forward and dropping into a lunge. Switch between legs and only lunge as deep as it is comfortable. This will help build rotational stability over a dynamic lower body, which in turn helps with a more efficient transfer of force from the lower body through the core to your arms and club. 

 

Rotational Strength Training

It’s pretty obvious that rotational strength is important for a golfer’s swing. There are a few ways to improve your rotation, which also means improving your swing. Being consistent with golfing exercises and stretches is a big part of golfers being able to continuously improve their rotation and swing. Here are a few ways to do that.

 

Stability Ball Twist With a Dumbbell

Starting by lying on your back with shoulders on the stability ball and hips off in a bridge position. Keep feet a little wider than hip-width apart, and have the dumbbell straight above at chest level. From this position, maintain a strong core, keep your hips in the bridge position, and slowly rotate towards one side and then the other. Make sure to keep your arms straight and feet pressed on the floor. Repeat five times on each side.

 

Half Kneeling Cable Lift

In a half-kneeling position with the knee down closer to the cable machine, maintain proper hip, knee, and ankle alignment on the forward leg. It is important to maintain a strong core and bring the weight towards your chest and then simultaneously rotate and push the weight away. Keep bare at eye level upon full rotation, control the movement through your core and avoid twisting through the lower back. Repeat 10 times on each side. 

 

Half Kneeling Resistance Band Rotation

In a half-kneeling position, the front knee should be closest to the wall. Place a ball between your leg and wall, grab a resistance band and create a little tension with arms pulled shoulder width apart and slightly lower than shoulder height. With your front knee pushing the ball to the wall, rotate your upper body away from the front leg. There should be little to no movement through your hips. Follow the movement with your eyes throughout the rotation. Repeat 10 times on each side. 

 

Power Training

Power is something every golfer strives for because power can translate to more yards off the tee and to the irons. Here are a few power exercises to add to your workout regime:

  • Slam Skater Vertical: Using a medicine ball, stand on one leg at a time and slam the ball side to side, maintaining your balance. 
  • Split Power Jump: Starting in a lunge position, power through grounded feet and keep your core tight and explode up. 
  • Weighted Power Jumps: Power up from grounded feet in an explosive move. These can be done with or without weight. 
  • Squat with Med Ball Rotation: Stand with feet separated shoulder width apart and toes forward. With a slight bend in the knee, engage your belly and keep your arms straight as you rotate slightly and toss the ball to a partner or against the wall. 

These exercises will help build strength and control in a golfer’s swing. 

 

Contact us today if you are interested in our golf school, tee times, or rates.

The Best Golf TV Shows to Watch

The Best Golf TV Shows to Watch

With the spread of a pandemic, many golf courses have closed to protect their patrons and staff. Our South Florida golf course is once again open to the public, but we understand that some of our guests may not be ready to return just yet. The coronavirus may be keeping you off your favorite green, but there’s no reason why you still can’t indulge in the game of golf from the comfort of your couch! Our South Florida country club wants to share the best golf tv shows to watch while at home. (more…)